Earn a Flexible Online Cybercrime Degree with Point Park University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Combine Your Passion for Cybersecurity and Criminal Justice with a Bachelor’s Degree in Cybersecurity and Investigation.

Cybersecurity continues to grow in priority as intelligence, law enforcement and national security receive more focus and face the challenges of a changed world. Students interested in cybercrime need academic programs that can prepare them for this cybersecurity specialty that combines technical and criminal justice expertise.

Both private and public industries are realizing a need for protection and understanding when it comes to cybercrime. With the incidence of cybercrime expected to continue to grow, graduates of Point Park University’s B.S. in Cybersecurity and Investigation program will continue to be in demand for years to come.

Point Park Online Bachelor’s Degree in Cybersecurity and Investigation Curriculum Overview

All courses in Point Park University’s cybercrime degree are offered fully online so you can earn your degree alongside your other professional and personal responsibilities. You’ll benefit from courses taught by professors who have hands on expertise in the field, so you’ll be career-ready when you graduate.

The security and Investigation curriculum helps bridge the gap between traditional technical training in cybersecurity and the desire to specialize in the field of cybercrime. Students will learn how to research, understand, and explore issues and provide critical analysis on cybercrime and cyber enforcement.

Transform your experience into college credit toward your Bachelor’s in Cybersecurity and Investigation

Point Park University offers robust Prior Learning Assessment and Advanced Standing/Experiential Learning Credit opportunities. Students can transfer credits from qualifying experiences including College Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST exams) or UEXCEL exams, Advanced Placement (AP) credit and experiential learning assessment portfolio submissions from prior work experience.

Experiential learning credits are not considered current coursework for financial aid and do not fulfill any of the minimum 30 credits that must be completed at Point Park University to graduate. In addition, experiential learning credits through portfolio submissions are capped at 18 credits. Kindly note that experiential learning credits can be used to meet the minimum transfer credits for degree completion programs.

Contact an enrollment counselor to learn more.

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Learn more about Point Park University’s Innovative, Online B.S. in Cybersecurity and Investigation

  • Next Start Date: August 28, 2022

Est. Program Length: 2 – 4 Years
Credit Hours: 120
Course Length: 8 Weeks
Cost Per Credit: $495
Transfer Credits Accepted: Up to 90
  • Est. Program Length: 2 – 4 Years

  • Credit Hours: 120

  • Course Length: 8 Weeks

  • Cost Per Credit: $495

  • Transfer Credits Accepted: Up to 90

B.S. in Cybersecurity and Investigation Course Offerings

Admission Requirements

Course Description

This course included communication theory as well as speech preparation, delivery, and communication technology. Student learning focuses on researching, composing, and delivering formal and impromptu speeches and presentations. Topics include research, analyzing and adapting audiences, message construction, outlining, delivery of messages and effective use of visual aids and technology. This course will develop each student’s ability to communicate effectively with respect to audience and purpose. The major emphasis is on the preparation and delivery of presentations ranging from one-on-one pitches and small group discussion to large audience speeches.

Course Description

Students will write argument-based assignments leading to an independently researched project based on academic and professional goals. Students will be required to 1.) find and integrate a variety of sources, 2.) read and analyze these sources, 3.) develop strong thesis statements that reflect perspectives on topics or issues, and 4.) construct persuasive arguments that engage with the viewpoints of experts and commentators. As the term progresses, students will have the opportunity to re-think or revise the ideas and perspectives they explored in earlier writing assignments by engaging with peer feedback and revising earlier drafts. Placement recommendations will require students to take ENGL 101 as a three credit course OR in conjunction with an additional credit of lab or studio instruction. Students who earn F or NP grades in ENGL 101 will be required to re-take the course in conjunction with a one-credit Writing Studio course.

Course Description

This course introduces students to the kinds of communities that people construct for themselves (e.g. social, political, artistic, etc.), explores how those communities are defined, and analyzes the values and dynamics that define online and on-ground communities. The notion of what it means to be a responsible member of the “community” will actively be explored and discussed through engagement and analysis of multiple communities including the online classroom community and the Point Park University community. Students will also begin to develop research skills, and analyze and create texts with attention to audience and purpose.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

(1) Define various communities, including online ones.
(2) Illustrate how community engagement builds leadership, organizational skills, and awareness of cultural and social values.
(3) Explain how the University mission statement, the Core Curriculum, and University resources and support services relate to the education and community of Point Park students.
(4) Describe and analyze aspects of urban community development using Pittsburgh as a focus model.
(5) Analyze problems and develop solutions independently and within a group.
(6) Locate, evaluate, and use information effectively for specific audiences and purposes.

Course Description

Throughout most of its history, criminal justice has been principally preoccupied with crime and its control as a local phenomenon. In the 21st century, criminal justice has found it necessary to expand its concern to an international perspective. The influence of foreign subjects victimizing U.S citizens, as well as laundering illegally obtained funds in other countries, requires the student to understand the expansion of common or complex crimes transnational. This course will be writing intensive, and will require the student to incorporate previous lessons into their writings. Prerequisite: CRMJ 150 and Senior Standing

Course Objectives

(1) Identify the causes of transnational criminal activity
(2) Examine efforts to combat this growing threat
(3) Identify the reasons for criminal proliferation on an international scale
(4) Analyze current treaties and national policies to address this international problem
(5) Identify the need for the INTERPOL Red Notice

Choose two of the following courses:

  • ECON 201 – Principles of Macroeconomics
  • GCS 175 – Intro to Global Cultural Studies
  • HIST 201 – Western Civilization I
  • HIST 202 – Western Civilization II
  • PADM 210 – Public Administration
  • POLS 205 – World Geography
  • POLS 250 – Intro to Study of Gov’t Systems
  • PHIL 215 – World Religions

Choose one of the following courses:

  • NSET 110 – Intro to Natural Sciences I
  • NSET 111 – Intro to Natural Sciences II

Choose one of the following courses:

  • MATH 150 -The Mathematical Experience
  • MATH 175 – Elementary Statistics
  • MATH 180 – College Algebra
  • *Math course level dependent on results of placement exam.

Choose one of the following courses:

  • ENGL 250 – World Lit: Drama, Poetry, Epic
  • ENGL 251 – World Lit: Novels

Choose two of the following courses:

  • PSYC 150 – Psychological Foundations
  • PSYC 214 – Psychology of Emotion
  • SOC 150 – Sociological Foundations

Choose one of the following courses:

  • BMGT 271 – The Money Thing: Life and Finances During and After College
  • BMGT 234 – Ethical Leadership
  • CMPS 330 – Electronic Commerce
  • ECON 202 – Principles of Microeconomics

Choose one of the following courses:

  • ART 100 – Intro to Visual Arts
  • COMM 290 – Seminar in Media Studies
  • COPA 250 – Exploring the Arts

Choose one of the following courses:

  • CMPS 114 – Problem Solving with Information Technology
  • GRID 103 – Graphic Design

Course Description

Description: This course will address the need for cyber security, origins of cyber theft, investigative methods, security procedures, software protection, the tactics of cyber criminals, while providing the student with a basic understanding of the problems and perpetrators of Cyber Crime.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. List and explain a range of key terms and concepts related to cyber security and cybercrime
  2. Explain and classify vulnerabilities resulting in a need for cyber security
  3. Explain and classify the most commonly used methods of investigation and cyber security
  4. Describe and classify the prominent patterns in cybercrime in terms of criminals, motivations, and criminal actions taken

Course Description

Description: Students will experience various methods and current trends to obviate cybercrime capabilities, through maximizing awareness, protecting crucial data, identifying potential threats and reacting in a proactive way to identify perpetrators.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and classify the most useful methods of recognizing cyber vulnerability
  2. Describe and evaluate useful approaches to protecting data and cyber access
  3. Identify and evaluate threats to cyber security

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course seeks to define the legal avenues available to effectively fight cyber criminals. It will rely on a clear and distinct awareness of all laws currently enforcing cyber crime and discuss ethical considerations in informational security and the protection of proprietary information. Students will research issues with regard to confidentiality, privacy, and the legal ramifications of internet activity.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the most common ethical dilemmas related to cyber crime
  2. Describe and categorize prominent controversies related to cyber laws and criminality
  3. Discuss and explain the role of intellectual property laws and cyber security
  4. Explain and analyze a range of factors related to enforcing cyber-related laws

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: The course will research the methods of investigation currently in use to thwart cybercriminal activities. It will demonstrate the tools necessary to track down cyber criminals, while preserving the integrity of the information and users affected by the infractions.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain and evaluate a range of methods for investigating cyber criminality
  2. Describe and evaluate tools and methods use to identify and pursue cyber criminals
  3. Create a basic plan model in a simulation to identify cyber criminals and enforce cyber laws

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course offers an in-depth understanding and need for an awareness of the vulnerabilities of individuals and organizations and examines how an analyst will perform risk assessments and implement strategies to thwart pending attacks and adopt proper models to obtain security.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe, classify, and evaluate common methods of risk management and preparedness for cyber attack
  2. Create cyber risk assessments based on sample data for vulnerabilities
  3. Create plans for strategies to repel cyber attacks and adapt to future threats

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course examines the criminal mindset of hackers and crackers. It explores the phycological profile of the perpetrators to establish motivational factors crucial in identifying violators. It identifies the motivation and desire factors, to conduct cyber-criminal activities.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and evaluate the mentalities of cyber criminals
  2. List, classify, and evaluate the common motives for people who turn to cyber crime
  3. Describe and analyze common methods for identifying and pursuing cyber criminals

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course would focus on a knowledge of cybercrime digital forensics and the development of an ability to apply digital forensic knowledge to cybercrime cases.  Students will learn techniques in identifying, protecting, and gathering information and evidence, retrieving data, analyzing, and evaluating data, preparing crime reports, and presenting information in a court on cybercrime. This course would involve studying case studies in cybercrime investigations.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and evaluate a range of forensic methods used by cyber forensic experts in their conducting of investigations
  2. Analyze data to gain useful insights for investigation of cyber crimes
  3. Create crime reports based on cyber forensics
  4. Describe and analyze case studies involving investigations of cybercrime

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: The student will research case studies of successful cybercrime investigations related to the methods of detection, apprehension, threat analysis and deterrence. By examining successful investigations, the student will use case studies to develop an acumen for developing strategies to protect targets and negate criminal attacks while providing clear avenues sources and methods, for identifying the perpetrators.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and evaluate a range of case studies related to solved cybercrime cases
  2. Describe and analyze data from unsolved cybercrime cases, building supported hypotheses regarding how the cases might be solved
  3. Describe and analyze patterns in cybercrime case studies
  4. Create and implement strategies for repelling and investigating cybercrime based on evidence from the study of case studies

Course Description
Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course focuses on understanding and obviating the theft of identity and personal information, while engaged in any of the social media outlets. It affords the student with a succinct awareness that more than just their selected friends may be viewing their information. It offers avenues and methods to protect oneself while harmlessly engaging in social banter and conversation.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and analyze the role of social media to cybercrime
  2. Describe and evaluate various methods of protecting social media accounts from infiltration and cyber crime
  3. Describe and analyze methods that investigators use to apply social media data to the investigation of cybercrime and other crimes

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course will focus on what constitutes cybercrime threats and delve into various types of cybercrime to give the student a better understanding of the issues. The course will include human and child trafficking on the internet, cyber bullying/stalking/harassment, cyber viruses and malware, phishing scams, identify theft, cyber currency crimes, digital piracy, and cyber terrorism.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and evaluate a range of cyber-facilitated crimes, including those that involve physical criminality
  2. Describe and analyze patterns in a range of cyber-facilitated crimes, including non-financial crimes
  3. Discuss and analyze the concept of cyber-terrorism and its possibilities
  4. Explain digital currency, block chain programming, and the role of crypto currency in criminal endeavors

Course Description

Prerequisites: CYBR 101 and 102

Description: This course will investigate the costs to society of cybercrime. This will include victimization, legal issues, damage to organizations from fraudulent activity, costs from personal data compromises, and costs to combating fraud and cybercrime. Costs also include detecting, responding to and mitigating cybercrime activity.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe and evaluate the direct and collateral damage done by cybercrime globally, including financial, physical, and social costs
  2. Explain and evaluate the financial costs of cybercrime in terms of direct costs to victims, the costs of security and mitigation / prevention, and the vulnerabilities to national security
  3. Classify and analyze the impacts of cyber vulnerabilities to the physical and political security and interests of nation states and global organizations

Course Description

This course introduces basic networking and security concepts. It serves as a precursor to the more advanced and specialized networking and security courses. Coverage of topics focuses on identifying and understanding the nomenclature of hardware and software use in modern networks.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) Describe how networks work.
(2) Explain how the Internet works.
(3) List and explain the protocols that make these possible.
(4) Demonstrate how computer security can be breached.
(5) Show and discuss methods to detect security breaches.
(6) Demonstrate how to prevent security breaches.

Course Description

Techniques for the design of computer networks beyond the user level are discussed. Perspectives on network design, estimation of traffic demand and application requirements, network cost analysis, topological design, and virtual network design, wireless network design issues are also discussed. Prerequisites: CMPS 161.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
(1) Describe how networks work.
(2) Explain how the Internet works.
(3) List and explain the protocols that make these possible.
(4) Explain how ARP, IP, TCP, and UDP work and how they are related.
(5) Develop client-server programs or something similar.

Course Description

Prerequisites: CMPS 161

Description: The course provides an overview of the types of crimes that occur online, how they are conducted and by whom.  It will introduce students to technologies to be used throughout this course and future courses.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to

  1. Research the latest information technology (IT) security trends to identify and classify existing and new security/cybercrime risks.
  2. Help develop, design, plan, and carry out their organization’s security strategy, standards and best practices.
  3. Create document reports that research and explain security breaches/cybercrime and the extent of the damage caused by the breaches.

Course Description

This class will provide an overview of computer security. The concepts of security in the context of the digital world will be discussed. The nuts and bolts of threat prevention, detection and removal are discussed. The student will be required to use a lab environment to simulate troubleshooting, preventing and fixing problems. Prerequisites: CMPS 161.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
(1) Prepare information and present material in a professional manner.
(2) Research developments in the application of computer security in a business environment and report the findings.
(3) Assess security needs in a business environment.
(4) Explain the design and implementation of security systems.
(5) Use tools to analyze, detect and remove threats.
(6) Use tools to analyze network traffic.

Course Description

Prerequisites: CMPS 263

Description: The goal of this course is an introduction to the dark web, sources for discovering sites, and security precautions. Topics include intelligence and analysis topics such as link analysis, clearnet, and dark targeting methodologies.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to

  1. Assess various crimes to determine the type of crime (cyber vs cyber-enabled) and the perpetrator(s).
  2. Apply the use of various technologies in preparation for research and analysis.
  3. Prepare reporting and background information with respect to the preparations necessary to begin an online investigation.

Recognize the difference between the ‘clear net’ and ‘dark web’ websites and demonstrate how to obtain information from these sites to be leveraged for further research and analysis.

Course Description

Prerequisites: CMPS 365

Description: Presents corporate and national cybersecurity considerations, such as privacy, intellectual property, cybercrime, and infrastructure protection. Students will learn and demonstrate effective management and communication skills through case study-analysis, class discussion, and effective cybersecurity policy development.

Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to

  1. Consider the laws, policies, and incentive structures regulating or impacting various public and private actors.
  2. Design and compose a written information security plan (WISP) that incorporates relevant cybersecurity policies for technology management.
  3. Develop ideas for potential reform of these actors.

Choose 3 of the following:

Course Description

A course on how Information Technology impacts organizations and how to use Information Technology to solve problems. Topics include: main concepts of Information Technology at a general level, online collaboration tools, application software, and information literacy as applied to searching and using the Internet. In addition, students will become proficient at an intermediate level in using application software. The student will learn each of the four software applications (Spreadsheets, Database, Word Processing and Presentation) and be able to apply them successfully to problem solving scenarios.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) Discuss why computers are necessary in all areas of business and society.
(2) Identify and explain the most-up-to date technology in an ever-changing environment .
(3) Define and explain the key concepts associated with computers and mobile devices, the Internet, apps and programs.
(4) Analyze current digital safety and digital security issues and develop solutions.
(5) Develop creative solutions for problem solving scenarios using computers, mobile devices and the Internet.
(6) Discuss current strategies for purchasing and using computers, mobile computers and place-aware, always-with-you personal devices to solve problems in the work place.
(7) Evaluate information resulting from Internet search.

Course Description

This Database course surveys topics in database systems. The course emphasizes the effective use of database (management) systems. Topics include access methods, data models, query languages, database design, query optimization, concurrency control, recovery, security, integrity, client-server architecture, and distributed database systems. Hands-on use will be a key part of the course.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

1) Explain the details of the relational data model.
2) Use the basic commands and functions of SQL.
3) Create data models and implement database designs.
4) Describe how normalization organizes data in a database.

Course Description

This course introduces basic programming concepts. Hands on programming will be a key part of the course. The course is designed to teach and reinforce basic programming techniques and strategies.

Course Description

This course will provide you with concepts and tools to utilize data for making informed business decisions. We will start with the raw data and work our way to conclusions and examine all the intermediate steps in detail. Topics as data collection, model selection, built-in assumptions, and uncertainty will be at the core of the course. You will familiarize yourself with tools to apply these concepts in practice.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

1) Illustrate why business analytics is important.
2) Describe when to apply which business analytics approach.
3) Apply business analytics approaches to business problems.
4)Interpret business analytic results.

Course Description

An introduction to spreadsheet, database management and communication software. A thorough understanding is achieved through laboratory assignments.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

(1) Develop practical business applications using spreadsheet software
(2) Develop practical business applications using database software
(3) Identify and explain the role that computers play in all businesses
(4) Develop a basic understanding of the Internet and networking

Course Description

Advanced topics in word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation management software. A thorough understanding is achieved through laboratory assignments. Prerequisite: CMPS 214.

Course Description

In this course fundamental data structures will be explored that are indispensable when programming. Some major
areas are objects, lists, arrays, stacks, queues, and more. Tradeoffs in terms of computational complexity and operations on
these data structures are also discussed. Prerequisites: CMPS 162.

Course Description

In this course, students will learn how to administer a server. This ranges from installing an operating system, remotely installing software packages through a package manager, configuring the system, managing security and encryption, backups, to shell scripting. A big component of this course is lab work. Prerequisites: CMPS 162.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) Install an operating system.
(2) Remotely install software on an operating system.
(3) Configure and run the installed programs.
(4) Install security patches.
(5) Perform maintenance remotely.
(6) Learn to write simple shell scripts for automating common tasks.

Course Description

This course continues where CMPS 162 and CMPS 260 leave off. The focus will be on problem solving but with a much higher difficulty level. The students will be required to write programs that involve multiple units of organization, e.g., classes. Several advanced algorithms will be discussed and should be implemented by the students. Prerequisites: CMPS 260

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) Apply all knowledge from CMPS 162 and CMPS 260 to solve real problems.
2) Decompose complex problems to find solutions.
(3) Construct complex user interfaces for running algorithms that solve problems.
(4) Collaborate in a group setting.
(5) Present project results and updates to stakeholders.

Course Description

The course focuses on the computerized and Web-based systems used in business. Topics covered will include knowledge management, customer relationship management, enterprise resource management, and supply chain management.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

(1) Examine the computerized systems used in Business
(2) Compare and contrast the various services of the Internet
(3) Examine web-based systems used in Business
(4) Explore Supply Chain Management
(5) Explore Customer Resource Management
(6) Research Information Technology Jobs
(7) Identify job skills required of Information Technology workers
(8) Explore Knowledge Management
(9) Explore Systems Development
(10) Research Protecting People and Information
(11) Explore Emerging Trends and Technologies

Course Description

This course provides information and analysis of e-commerce. Course topics include – e-commerce business models, e-commerce infrastructure, implementing an e-commerce website, e-commerce security and payment systems, e-commerce marketing concepts, ethical, social and political e-commerce issues, social networks, and how highly portable, place-aware, always-with-you personal devices are expanding the e-commerce environment.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

(1) Identify the E-Commerce business models.
(2) Describe E-Commerce security issues and solutions and E-commerce payment systems.
(3) Differentiate between the different Web marketing approaches.
(4) Explain the client/server infrastructure that supports E-commerce.
(5) Illustrate the different legal, ethical and political issues related to E-Commerce.
(6) Provide analytical tools to understand opportunities in unserved or underserved new E-commerce markets.
(7) Communicate current information about E-commerce resulting from Internet search.

Course Description

Part-time job experience approved by the department in a local business or industrial firm. Method of evaluation is agreed upon by the departmental and job-site supervisors. May include periodic reports, a day-by-day journal, computer programs with documentation, user’s manuals and/or demonstrations. Prerequisites: Junior Standing and permission.

Course Description

This course provides students with a wide array of programming languages and emphasizes strengths and weaknesses relative to a given problem. Students will work on a practical problem in a language of choice to gain real world experience. Prerequisites: CMPS 261, CMPS 262

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) List programming languages.
(2) Describe tradeoffs between programming problems.
(3) Explain programming paradigms.
(4) Identify which language is particularly useful for a given problem.
(5) Design and implement programs in a given language.

Course Description

This course will provide a foundation in several facets of establishing and maintaining a website. This includes the latest advances in client side as well as server side technologies. The goal is to have students design, implement, and run advanced web applications. It will also cover in some detail the protocols required for web development. Prerequisites: CMPS 261, CMPS 262.

Course Description

This course explores modem databases that do not strictly follow the relational database design and SQL. Advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. Students will be required to work with at least one NoSQL databases and write a program that utilizes it. Prerequisites: CMPS 163, CMPS 261.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) Decide when NoSQL databases are applicable.
(2) List the differences between SQL and NoSQL databases.
(3) Explain the tradeoffs of NoSQL databases.
(4) Analyze scalability considerations.
(5) Learn to work with at least one NoSQL database.

Course Description

A continuation of Electronic Commerce I and may include some of the topics in Electronic Commerce I or an in-depth review of these topics. Prerequisite: CMPS 330.

Course Description

In this course, students will learn how to develop applications for mobile devices. Mobile devices are more restricted in screen space but also have new opportunities such as built in GPS. This course requires completing a group project for a given mobile platform. Prerequisites: CMPS 361.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

(1) Write applications for mobile devices.
(2) Understand the specific design considerations for mobile devices.
(3) Utilize sensors only available on mobile devices.
(4) Create user interface designs for mobile devices.

Course Description

This course continues where CMPS 364 leaves off and focuses on architectures and implementations that are able to handle large data sets. For this course several tools will be applied to real data sets. Prerequisites: CMPS 364.

Course Description

A follow up course on CMPS 163 that is much more technical. In addition to a mathematical understanding of algorithms this course also lets students implement their own algorithms. Prerequisites: CMPS 163, CMPS 261, and CMPS 262.

Course Description

Course in which students will learn how to commercialize their ideas and software into a profitable business. The focus is on customer development, i.e., acquiring customers, and uses the lean business model canvas. The essential element of this course is to create a prototype and investigate whether a customer base can be identified. Prerequisites: CMPS 163 and CMPS 361.

Course Description

The course will give students a clear understanding of the field of electronic commerce. Included will be the fundamental business processes/plans that are necessary to understand before conducting electronic commerce. The student will learn principles underlying the construction of data driven systems, particularly relational ones, and apply these principles to an actual semester long group project. The project is a good sized one, and provides an opportunity for the application
of software engineering principles. Prerequisites: CMPS 163 and CMPS 361.

Course Description

In this course the student will demonstrate their mastery of material undertaken in coursework by selecting and creating a programming solution to a significant business application. The group will work together to construct their solution and present a working model of their problem to the class. This project is designed to give the student a hands-on demonstration of their coursework suitable for a portfolio of accomplishments. Prerequisites: All I.T. Core Classes.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

(1) Define business and user requirements for a software application.
(2) Develop and deploy a software application including a front end and back end component.
(3) Apply a business analytics approach as a component of the software application.
(4) Document the development process including security considerations.
(5) Collaborate in different roles as part of a team environment.
(6) Present results at various stages of development in a professional manner.



Choose 3 of the following:

Course Description
This course lays the foundation for the processes used by the intelligence community to determine credibility of assets and acquisition of intelligence prior to placing that intelligence into a matrix or on the i2 chart.
Course Description
This course presents an in-depth analysis of the methods used by terrorist organizations to finance their global operations and the investigative techniques used to counter such measures. The means used by terrorist organizations to raise, transfer, and spend funds will be analyzed. It will also include an analysis of how the monies are spent by these organizations. During the computer lab portion to this course, students will become proficient in the use of I-2 program software. This course includes an analytic presentation/briefing to members of the intelligence community by the student.

Course Description
As a nation of laws, this course covers the laws governing the collection, dissemination and use of intelligence as well as defining the 17 agencies in the Intelligence Community; includes a detailed study of the Patriot Act, national Intelligence Act and Emergency Powers of the President.

Course Description

This course examines, both objectively and subjectively, current issues in U.S. Security Policy both nationally and internationally. Students will compare various national intelligence strategies over a period of time from its inception to its current state of affairs.

Course Description
This course examines the type of methods employed by intelligence agencies to affect desired political outcomes and policies of foreign nations, which are favorable to U.S. interest and sovereignty. It examines the difference between overt and covert non-military psychological operations designed to achieve the desired results and possible blow back from such operations.

Course Description

The world of the 21st century is one in which hatred, instability, and violent political conflict remain all too common. This course will introduce students to an analysis and understanding of recent, current, and possible near future violent conflicts in the world, including the political, historical, and social forces behind them, as well as indicators and warnings that may help forecast such events. Prereg: INTL 101 and INTL 302

Course Objectives

  1. Acquire a deeper knowledge of the major events and issues in global politics that resulted in recent or current wars or military interventions or may result in them in the near future
    2. Acquire a deeper knowledge of the states and groups involved in current or potential violent conflicts around the world, including their social and political motivations, diplomatic relations, and economic and military power
    3. Better understand the impact of conflicts in the world on the U.S. and any U.S. national interests involved in such conflicts
    4. Engage in critical thinking by using case study analysis to compare and contrast recent, current, and near conflicts and military interventions

Course Description

This course analyzes a wide range and variety of current and near future threats to US national security and international security. It also introduces students to important specific concepts and methods of intelligence analysis. Students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of threat analysis.
Pre re: INTL 101 and 102

Course Objectives

1) Better understand analytical techinques used by the Intelligence Community.
2) Use critical thinking to overcome biases and psychological barriers to good analysis.
3) Be able to understand, identify, and explain the concept of national interests.
4) Understand the role of threat analyses in national security planning.
5) Identify and understand major national and international security threats, their origins, nature, and the major actors involved.

Careers in Cybercrime and Cyber Enforcement in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania – and Beyond

As the cybercrime field continues to grow, more graduates will be needed to enter the workforce. Cybercrime professionals work in a variety of settings.

Graduates may accept jobs in:

  • Government
  • Law Enforcement
  • Private Industry

With a degree in Cybersecurity and Investigation, graduates might:

  • Solve security problems
  • Become information security analysts
  • Perform digital forensics for a policy department
  • Conduct counter terrorism or crime analysis for the FBI
  • Enter a project management field to research and model software used to protect organizations against cybercrime or to model potential vulnerabilities in computer software that cyber criminals might attack.

Next Steps

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Discover the Point Park University Online degree that will help you further your current career, or forge a new career path.

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Official Transcripts

Print and complete the Transcript Request Form and email it to getstarted@pointpark.edu

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Accreditation

Point Park University is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and complies with all regulations of the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

3624 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
267-284-5000